1950 Chevrolet Deluxe – Interior Climate Controls


By Steve Schaeber-MACS technical editor

There’s a neat little repair shop here in Lansdale, PA that is well known by many residents of the borough, and one which I walk past almost every day. This morning I saw there was an old green Chevy sitting in their parking lot, so I had to stop and check it out. Turns out it belongs to their tech, who immediately started telling me about all the neat features on this antique, and yes, all of them still work!

S1540171 (Fig 1)

Talk about keeping it simple! There are only three sliders to control airflow. The top knob says DEF, and when you slide it left to right you can choose between OFF, DE-FOG and DE-ICE. The middle knob says AIR, which controls the blower motor speed; your choices are OFF, LOW, MED and HI. The bottom knob says TEMP, which simply shows an arrow surrounding the word WARMER.

S1540154 (Fig 2)

If you just want to have fresh air blow in, there’s also a VENT knob, located underneath the radio in the middle of the dash board.

S1540202 (Fig 3)

This long black tube is under the hood on the driver’s side of the car. It’s the fresh air intake for the VENT control. Can you see where the cable connects to open and close the vent door?

S1540197 (Fig 4)

Take a look at the climate control system in the car you’re driving, we’ve come a long way in 64 years haven’t we?

As always, I’d love to hear from you, drop me an email at steve@macsw.org

If you’re a service professional and not a MACS member yet, you should be, http://bit.ly/10zvMYg for more information.
You can E-mail us at macsworldwide@macsw.org . To locate a Mobile Air Conditioning Society member repair shop in your area. Click here to find out more about your car’s mobile A/C and engine cooling system.

The 35th annual Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) Worldwide Training Conference and Trade Show, Meet me at MACS Make Connections that Matter, February 5-7, 2015 at the Caribe Royale, Orlando, FL.

 

Posted in Automotive, Automotive Aftermarket, Automotive training, Mobile Air Conditioning | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

What kind of tech do we really need?


by Andy Fiffick, MACS Chairman and CEO

Recently I sat in on a shop management training class, and I heard some things that made me think about my own business. The instructor, a shop owner himself, said only 20% of the work that passes through his bays requires the skills of an A-level technician. Most of the jobs in his business can be done by B- or C-techs, and they’re mostly maintenance jobs that net a higher percentage of profit for the shop compared with the kind of work that requires an A-tech’s diagnostic skills.

Cars are a lot better than they used to be, and considering how the type of repairs and service we do every day has changed over the 39 years I’ve been in this business, I can see his point. But if all that’s true, why does a shop still need a tech with advanced diagnostic skills? How does my investment in that tech’s training and higher pay- pay-off for the shop?

IMG_2955

Here’s my answer. I would never want to put a less-experienced technician on any job because the lack of experience may lead to something being overlooked. That’s not only risky for me but also bad for our customer. The experienced technician is more likely to notice the worn part, the tell-tale stain, a leak, a smell or some other clue that indicates the need for additional work or maybe even an impending breakdown. Customers whose cars break down or flash a check-engine light shortly after driving away from my shop are not happy people. While it can be tough informing them of the need for additional work, they are much more appreciative if we let them know ahead of time rather than letting them find out the hard way.

For this reason, none of my shops have dedicated low-pay lube techs. Everyone is a lube tech! This way, every customer’s car is seen by an experienced technician who is more able to judge the true condition of their vehicle and more likely to see potential issues that should be noted on the repair order. Maybe we won’t completely avoid unpleasant surprises for our clients, but we can certainly minimize their cost and inconvenience and preserve their trust in our service.

Having experienced techs do regular service work makes good economic sense too. If I’m paying an A-tech $25.00 an hour and he can complete a task in one hour that takes a C-tech at $15.00 an hour two hours to complete, I’m saving 5 bucks an hour. In addition, since the A-tech completed the job in only one hour, he can move on to another job, and we both get another billable hour to sell.

In my opinion, the more “A” technicians we have in the shop, the better we are. But they are hard to find, so most of our shops have only two; the rest are B- and C-level technicians. That’s one reason I place so much value on training; if I can’t find A-level technicians, I’m not afraid to grow my own, because in the end they’re well worth the investment.

If you’re a service professional and not a MACS member yet, you should be, http://bit.ly/10zvMYg for more information.
You can E-mail us at macsworldwide@macsw.org . To locate a Mobile Air Conditioning Society member repair shop in your area. Click here to find out more about your car’s mobile A/C and engine cooling system.

The 35th annual Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) Worldwide Training Conference and Trade Show, Meet me at MACS Make Connections that Matter, February 5-7, 2015 at the Caribe Royale, Orlando, FL.

 

 

 

 

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Robert Darbelnet of AAA to Keynote MACS 2015 Training Event


RLD corp photo

The Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) Worldwide is pleased to announce that Robert L. Darbelnet, president and CEO of AAA will be the featured speaker at MACS keynote luncheon on Thursday, February 5, 2015 sponsored by Mahle-RTI during the MACS 2015 Training Event and Trade Show in Orlando, Florida.

AAA is a not-for-profit federation of 44 motor clubs that serves more than 54 million members in the United States and Canada.

Mr. Darbelnet became AAA president and CEO in November 1994, after serving 11 years as CEO of CAA-Quebec.  He began his AAA career as an emergency road service driver for the Quebec Automobile Club in 1973. Mr. Darbelnet is a past Chairman of ITS America and the Alliance Internationale de Tourisme (AIT) based in Geneva. He served as Deputy President for Mobility of the FIA (Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile) from 2001 to 2005, as an elected member of the FIA Senate from 1997 to 2005, as President of FIA Region III from 2005 to 2009 and as Trustee of the FIA Foundation from 2003 to 2011. He currently serves as Chairman of the Global Mobility Alliance and trustee of the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety.

Mr. Darbelnet will discuss opportunities for independent service and repair facilities
during his keynote speech.

The MACS 2015 Training Event and Trade Show will showcase 24 expert speakers speaking on a variety of cutting-edge, intense mobile A/C service and repair issues.
Registration will open September 1, 2014 on the MACS website at www.macsw.org

Founded in 1981, the Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) is the leading non-profit trade association for the mobile air conditioning, heating and engine cooling system segment of the automotive aftermarket. MACS represents a growing membership in North America and 47 countries around the world, and is affiliated with the Vehicle Air Conditioning Specialists of Australia (VASA). MACS also provides information and services to more than 60,000 industry shops, suppliers and technicians. The Society serves the industry through informational tools, self-paced educational materials, leader-led training clinics, advocacy and other member services. Since 1991, MACS has assisted more than 1 million technicians to comply with 1990 Clean Air Act requirements for certification in refrigerant recovery and recycling to protect the environment. To learn more about MACS Worldwide visit our website at http://www.macsw.org. MACS 2015 Training Event and Trade Show, Meet me at MACS; Make Connections that Matter!  will take place February 5-7, at the Caribe Royale Hotel and Convention Center in Orlando, FL.

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A mobile A/C bus training class is available August 29, 2014 in Texas


Member of MACS, Bus-Air Manufacturing of Rhome, TX have announced an A/C training clinic for school bus, shuttle bus and fire truck technicians including a section 609 certification testing class to begin at 8:00am, August 29th at the Texas Motor Speedway,
( Speedway Club) in Ft. Worth, Texas.

Busairlogo.jpg

Bus air specialists Bobby Woods Jr. and Tony Woods will deliver the presentations.

Bus-Air will cover the ABC’s of A/C, history, modern applications and system components in an intense class based on practical experiences in mobile A/C repair gained over 44 years. Meet one of the founders of aftermarket A/C from 1957. Hats and shirts will be given away.

school bus

The afternoon class session ( 1:30-3:00 ) will be held at World Headquarters of Bus-Air Manufacturing, a 70,000 SF facility just 7 miles west of the Texas Motor Speedway on Hwy 114. This class will be hands-on teaching of the fundamentals of A/C diagnosis and
repair..how to read gauges etc.

Cost is $ 175.00 per person and RSVP is mandatory by 8-22-14
Breakfast and lunch will be served.

To register contact:

Bobby Woods
General Manager
Bus-Air Mfg.
817-636-2308 Office
817-636-5703 Fax
800-473-9914 Toll Free
817-771-5793 Cell
Bob@bus-air.com

Posted in #off road vehicles, Automotive, Automotive training, Mobile Air Conditioning, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mobile A/C service tip: mind the service port caps


By Steve Schaeber, MACS Worldwide

You’ve probably heard this from MACS’ before, but it bears repeating.  Service port caps are the primary seal for an A/C system’s service ports.  Making sure they are in place and properly installed is one of the first and most important steps a technician can take. This doesn’t only apply to when performing A/C service on your customer’s vehicles.  Any time you see a vehicle come in your bay, and the service port caps are missing, you should always notify the customer, and recommend that they have new caps installed.  Not only will this help to prevent refrigerant from leaking out of their A/C system, but it will also help keep their A/C system performing at its very best.  After all, a properly charged system will provide optimum performance, and as refrigerant leaks out, performance only has one way to go, and that’s down!

 

2004 Acura

2001 Acura

Here’s a 2001 Acura 3.5TL that came into the MACS shop today.  Can you guess what was the first thing I noticed?

S1540072 (Fig 2)

This cap “less” port has been getting SLAMMED with ram air, along with all the rain water and road debris that goes along with it. S1540075 (Fig 3)

I love the location where Honda decided to place the high side service port on this vehicle.  In fact, you really can’t ask for better placement.  Talk about convenient!

S1540073 (Fig 4)

Same goes for the low side port; a great location, convenient, and easy to access.  There’s plenty of room for connecting your hoses.  Not to mention, they placed the J639 label right near the low side port, so there’s no hunting around for the information!

If you’re a service professional and not a MACS member yet, you should be, http://bit.ly/10zvMYg for more information.
You can E-mail us at macsworldwide@macsw.org . To locate a Mobile Air Conditioning Society member repair shop in your area. Click here to find out more about your car’s mobile A/C and engine cooling system.

The 35th annual Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) Worldwide Training Conference and Trade Show, Meet me at MACS Make Connections that Matter, February 5-7, 2015 at the Caribe Royale, Orlando, FL.

 

 

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EPA new proposed SNAP rule


On July 9, 2014, the U.S. EPA issued a proposed rule which would change the listing status for certain substitutes under the Significant New Alternatives Policy Program (SNAP).

Under this proposed rule, various hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and HFC-containing blends that were previously listed as acceptable alternatives to ozone-depleting substances (ODS) will be listed as unacceptable for some uses. This proposed rule is part of the Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program, under which the EPA continuously reviews alternatives to ODS to find substitutes that pose less overall risk to human health and the environment. As safer alternatives become available for particular applications, the list of acceptable substitutes is evaluated and revised.

Among the proposed changes is the following:

For motor vehicle air conditioning systems in newly manufactured, light-duty vehicles

• HFC-134a as unacceptable starting with model year (MY) 2021; (emphasis added) and

• The refrigerant blends SP34E, R-426A (also known as RS-24), R-416A (also known as HCFC Blend Beta or FRIGC FR12), R-406A, R-414A (also known as HCFC Blend Xi or GHG-X4), R-414B (also known as HCFC Blend Omicron), HCFC Blend Delta (also known as Free Zone), Freeze 12, GHG-X5, and HCFC Blend Lambda (also known as GHG-HP) as unacceptable starting with MY 2017.

Following is a link to the EPA website that contains copies of the proposed rules.

http://www.epa.gov/ozone/snap/regulations.html

If you’re a service professional and not a MACS member yet, you should be, http://bit.ly/10zvMYg for more information.
You can E-mail us at macsworldwide@macsw.org . To locate a Mobile Air Conditioning Society member repair shop in your area. Click here to find out more about your car’s mobile A/C and engine cooling system.

The 35th annual Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) Worldwide Training Conference and Trade Show, Meet me at MACS Make Connections that Matter, February 5-7, 2015 at the Caribe Royale, Orlando, FL.

The Mobile Air Conditioning Society’s blog has been honored as the best business to business blog in the Automotive Aftermarket by the Automotive Communications Awards and the Car Care Council Women’s Board!

When having your mobile A/C system professionally serviced, insist on proper repair procedures and quality replacement parts. Insist on recovery and recycling so that refrigerant can be reused and not released into the atmosphere.

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Service tip: use your gauges


A quality set of gauges is necessary to accurately measure pressures. It is not necessary that the gauges be the most expensive, but be prepared to spend enough to get a durable and accurate set. Digital gauges should be considered, and while shopping for gauges, buying a micron gauge to monitor vacuum before charging is a good idea. A 0-100 psia trans-ducer (30” Hg to 100psi) added to the low side gauge and a 0-500 psig transducer added to the high side gauge can be powered with a separate dedicated power supply attached to the diagnostic cart.

DSC_0043These transducers can then be connected to your DVOM or Lab Scope and be monitored for changes over time. The point of adding the transducer to the high and low side gauges is to get a digital readout of the gauge pressure read-ings. Logging this type of data is not necessary to repair the vehicle, but is useful in technician education because if the tech understands what happens with pressure over time, they can better understand system operation.

If you’re a service professional and not a MACS member yet, you should be, http://bit.ly/10zvMYg for more information.
You can E-mail us at macsworldwide@macsw.org . To locate a Mobile Air Conditioning Society member repair shop in your area. Click here to find out more about your car’s mobile A/C and engine cooling system.

The 35th annual Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) Worldwide Training Conference and Trade Show, Meet me at MACS Make Connections that Matter, February 5-7, 2015 at the Caribe Royale, Orlando, FL.

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A compressor repair story


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How does a mobile A/C accumulator work?



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Got trucks? get A/C training!


Are you among the best of the best of heavy duty and off-road technicians?

TruckCliniclogo
RSVP now for top shelf heavy duty A/C training and plant tour at RED DOT in Seattle, Saturday September 20th!

MACS members and those who should be MACS members are increasingly working on more heavy duty and off-road vehicles. The MACS database is full of trucking, fleet, agricultural, mining and industrial vehicle businesses. In response, MACS and RED DOT are kicking off a series of top shelf, high-value factory centered training events for the heavy duty and off-road vehicle mobile A/C technician.

Blake-Gordon

On Saturday, September 20th, acclaimed heavy duty A/C trainer, Blake Gordon of Polar Mobility will focus a training session on the idiosyncrasies of servicing A/C systems in heavy duty and off-road vehicles and RED DOT will open its doors for to host a plant tour and hands-on training session.

REDDOTtestchamber

“MACS member facilities are finding that their A/C repair businesses are expanding into more heavy duty and off-road vehicle services and to continue to fulfill our training mission to the industry, MACS is adapting training content and events to meet this training need,” remarked Elvis L. Hoffpauir, MACS president and chief operating officer.

Attendance at this class is limited! RSVP now by registering at the MACS website at www.macsw.org
or call 215/631-7020 x 306. Class fees are $75 for MACS members and $125 for non-members. Continental breakfast and lunch are included. Registration will close on September 15, 2014.

 

The Mobile Air Conditioning Society’s blog has been honored as the best business to business blog in the Automotive Aftermarket by the Automotive Communications Awards and the Car Care Council Women’s Board!

When having your mobile A/C system professionally serviced, insist on proper repair procedures and quality replacement parts. Insist on recovery and recycling so that refrigerant can be reused and not released into the atmosphere.

If you’re a service professional and not a MACS member yet, you should be, http://bit.ly/10zvMYg for more information.
You can E-mail us at macsworldwide@macsw.org . To locate a Mobile Air Conditioning Society member repair shop in your area. Click here to find out more about your car’s mobile A/C and engine cooling system.

The 35th annual Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) Worldwide Training Conference and Trade Show, Meet me at MACS Make Connections that Matter, February 5-7, 2015 at the Caribe Royale, Orlando, FL.

 

Posted in #1234yf, #off road vehicles, Automotive training, Mobile Air Conditioning, Refrigerants | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment