How many R-1234yf cars are in the EU?


Fun Fact: In 2013, there were 99,609 vehicles using R-1234yf A/C systems

In 2014, there are 186924.

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Thanks to

http://www.duh.de

for the stats!

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More on R-1234yf


By Steve Schaeber, MACS Technical Editor

Continuing on the conversation I had with Tom Morris of Honeywell, here is part two of Steve’s yf Blog series, covering some of what we discussed.

Q.Do you envision the heavy duty truck and/or off-road vehicle market using R-1234yf? Have there been applications for SNAP approval for expanded use of R-1234yf in new vehicles beyond cars and light trucks?

“We see no reason why they could not use it from a technical standpoint.” Tom explained that within the US there is SNAP (Significant New Alternatives Policy) approval, which is required for using a refrigerant other than CFCs in automobiles. SNAP approval for R-1234yf, as it currently exists, is limited to light duty vehicles, meaning passenger cars, pickup trucks, mini vans, SUVs, etc., and does not currently allow for larger vehicles. Morris commented that “before that could happen, the industry would have to conduct a risk assessment.” There are significant differences when you get into these larger vehicles, such as refrigerant charge amount, and they would just have to go through the risk assessments to confirm that other refrigerant could be used safely in those vehicles. However, unless there is a regulation or another business incentive, it’s unlikely they would switch from R-134a at this time.  He further said that beyond refrigerant choices, the HD industry has other, perhaps more pressing issues to deal with currently, such as fuel mileage regulations. At the moment, EPA is saying you can use R-134a (in heavy duty vehicles) for the foreseeable future.  However, as one may expect, once there’s an incentive or a proposed regulation, they might begin efforts to look at it. Tom also mentioned that while there may be no technical reason, there are no market drivers to push them towards it.

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But doesn’t the SNAP list cover any mobile air conditioner; not just those in cars and light trucks?

According to Morris, SNAP assessments for R-1234yf were based on how “light duty” vehicles behave in accident scenarios.  However, when discussing a heavy duty tractor trailer truck, often with a sleeper cab in back, you now have to consider things such as the number of hours of operation, much different crash scenarios, different ignition sources (sometimes sleeper cabs have cooking devices), along with air conditioning systems that contain three or four pounds of refrigerant. Tom went on to explain particularly that some off road vehicles have large cabs, large amounts of glass and could be operating in extreme external conditions. Many have significant air conditioning systems that may require minor changes to make sure HFO-1234yf can be used safely.

I asked Morris if this only applies to light-duty vehicles, then does the EPA have other regulations covering large trucks?

“Not specifically as it relates to the air conditioning system or R-1234yf,” although he explained there are regulations that relate to fuel economy standards. “Those trucks use a great deal of fuel, as you might imagine, sometimes operating 150,000 miles or more per year.” From a vehicle sales standpoint, this year there’s going to be about 16 million cars sold in the US, and for heavy duty vehicles it’s about 150 to 160,000 per year on average. “Certainly when I’m driving down the New Jersey Turnpike the number of trucks on the road doesn’t seem small, but compared to the amount of new light duty vehicles sold per year, it’s a relatively smaller number.” For truck manufacturers, focusing on the fuel economy issue is probably a bigger priority for them in the short term.

If you’re a service professional and not a MACS member yet, you should be! Become a member and receive a technical newsletter with information like what you’ve just read in this blog post visit http://bit.ly/10zvMYg for more information.

You can E-mail us at macsworldwide@macsw.org . To locate a Mobile Air Conditioning Society member repair shop in your area. Click here to find out more about your car’s mobile A/C and engine cooling system.

Mobile A/C professionals should plan to attend 35th annual Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) Worldwide Training Conference and Trade Show, Meet me at MACS Make Connections that Matter, February 5-7, 2015 at the Caribe Royale, Orlando, FL.

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MACS to roll out new Section 609 Certification program on January 1, 2015


MACS Worldwide Section 609 technician training program, updated for
R-1234yf, approved by U.S. EPA
The Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) Worldwide will roll out a new Refrigerant Recovery and Recycling Technician Certification Training Program on January 1, 2015. MACS will initiate proctored training, self-study training and online training simultaneously on that date.

Periodically, the U.S. EPA requires all Section 609 Technician Certification Programs to update their training materials, this year to “incorporate information on three new alternatives found acceptable subject to use conditions in motor vehicle air conditioning under the Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program, HFO-1234yf, R-744 (CO2) and HFC-152a.”

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Since its beginning, MACS has regularly developed and expanded its Section 609 program to reflect industry changes in technology, service equipment and procedures, tools, alternative refrigerants and regulatory requirements.

MACS submitted the requested training materials for review, and on November 13, 2014, received notification from the U.S. EPA that “Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) Worldwide has met the requirements of the update and satisfactorily submitted revised Section 609 training and certification materials. With this letter EPA confirms MACS Worldwide’s Section 609 Technician Training and Certification Program approval. MACS Worldwide will remain on EPA’s list of approved programs.”

“What this means,” explains Elvis L. Hoffpauir, MACS Worldwide president and chief operating officer, “is that in response to the introduction of the new refrigerant
R-1234yf and its unique service procedures MACS has met the new training standards for mobile A/C technicians as required by the EPA. In addition to meeting the requirements for Section 609 programs set by the U.S. EPA, MACS is also the first (and as of this writing the only organization) to certify its program to SAE International Standard J2845, “R-1234yf (HFO-1234yf) and R-744 Technician Training for Service and Containment of Refrigerants Used in Mobile A/C Systems.” The scope of this SAE standard states, “The technician shall be trained to recognize which refrigerant is being handled, how to handle it safely and be equipped with the essential information, proper equipment and tools, which are unique to these refrigerants.” (See listing of the MACS program at http://www.sae.org/macdb/gethome.do and click on “Search.”)

EPA is not requiring a new Section 609 certification for handling R-1234yf, however if technicians want their Section 609 certification card to read that they are certified to recover R-1234yf, MACS will require they review the new training material and take a new test.

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Change, price and respect


By Andy Fiffick, Chairman and CEO MACS Worldwide, president Rad-Air Complete Car Care, Cleveland, OH

CoolCarEntrance

I don’t know about your shop, but pricing seems to be on our minds every hour of every day. First, what is wrong with the vehicle, what kind of diagnostic time is involved to correctly find the root of any given problem? Secondly, what do the parts cost us? How much should we mark them up? Third, how long will it actually take to install the needed parts (not book time) and what can go wrong to delay the installation? Will we need more diagnostic time once the initial repairs are made? Is our price competitive? Are we charging too little or too much? What should we charge for our time?

Year after year I see our industry struggle with charging full fare for our services. Some shop owners are downright afraid to make price changes. I hear the same line everywhere – “we just can’t raise our prices.” However, no one can provide solid evidence why we can’t. We want to be the good old shop down the street that always gives the customer a good deal. We would rather make less money than have the reputation of being pricey. The problem with this practice is that you may not be around long enough to service your clients if you can’t make enough funds to hire the best staff and keep up with technology, equipment, and training.

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Our industry has three inherent problems: 1) We’re afraid of change and rejection. 2) We do not operate as professionally as we should. 3) We don’t project professionalism as well as we should. Look at how other professions operate and take note. Many operate as well-oiled machines. Our family dentist has this down pat! I get three contacts (phone, text, or e-mail messages) prior to my appointment starting two weeks out. I receive great service and am treated well. They book my next appointment before I leave the office and I get a follow up call one week later. In this case, I have to respect and admire the dentist and his business. Furthermore, I respect the profession for the same reasons. My wife has the same experience with her hair-dresser. The same could be said for our attorney, accountant and so on. All of these professions operate in a way that demand respect and we can learn from that business model.

Consider changing your business plan to be more professional. We need to be more like doctors, dentists, and attorneys. Institute a sense of pride and professionalism and price accordingly. If we act and perform more professionally, we can increase our hourly rate and the consumer would be glad to pay.

We in the automotive repair industry must stop trying to beat each other up on price and charge the client for our services according to what the fair market will bear and what our true internal costs are. We could learn a lot from doctors, lawyers, dentists, barbers, and hair stylists!

If you’re a service professional and not a MACS member yet, you should be! Become a member and receive a technical newsletter with information like what you’ve just read in this blog post visit http://bit.ly/10zvMYg for more information.

You can E-mail us at macsworldwide@macsw.org . To locate a Mobile Air Conditioning Society member repair shop in your area. Click here to find out more about your car’s mobile A/C and engine cooling system.

Mobile A/C professionals should plan to attend 35th annual Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) Worldwide Training Conference and Trade Show, Meet me at MACS Make Connections that Matter, February 5-7, 2015 at the Caribe Royale, Orlando, FL.

 

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Service information: What do techs want?


By Elvis L. Hoffpauir, MACS president and chief operating officer

This fall, MACS explored accessing service information, and our associated survey on the topic drew more than 200 responses, some unexpected and enlightening.

Given the technology-saturated world we live in, we tend to think of this subject and most others first in terms of electronic access, aps and the myriad of devices which are portals to this exalted realm. However, some of our survey respondents reminded us that there are resources other than high-tech gadgetry, and that the human factor remains a critical component in our endeavors.

Don’t get me wrong, technology is great, even essential, but one respondent reminds us that we “Still use some paper!” Even more important, our respondents reminded us that we often access important service information from “experienced mechanics” or “talking to other techs.”

While most often information searches fall within the “sweet spot” for automotive aftermarket service of vehicles five to ten years old, some searches are for classic vehicles, or not for auto and light truck at all, but rather one of the many other types of vehicles (for on-road and off-road) in which A/C is installed.

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We asked survey respondents what they were typically working on when accessing service information. Not surprisingly, “HVAC” was the top response, closely followed by “electrical/electronic,” and “engine” was also a frequent response. Much less frequent responses were, in descending order, “transmission/drive line,” “steering/suspension” and “brakes.”

What information do techs look for most often? Wiring diagrams led the categories here, diagnostics was second and specifications a respectable third. Again, in descending order, respondents searched for TSBs, descriptions and operations, and R&R details.

Seventy percent of those responding to the survey said they used aftermarket service information, and 65 percent have purchased OEM service information. Reasons given for turning to OEM service information differed slightly from those for using aftermarket information. Diagnostics was the leading reason cited, closely followed by wiring diagrams; then came specifications, reprogramming, descriptions and operations, and TSBs.

The majority of respondents agree that good service information is a critical factor in achieving effective and efficient repairs, and as technology continues to evolve, will surely become even more critical.

 

If you’re a service professional and not a MACS member yet, you should be! Become a member and receive a technical newsletter with information like what you’ve just read in this blog post visit http://bit.ly/10zvMYg for more information.

You can E-mail us at macsworldwide@macsw.org . To locate a Mobile Air Conditioning Society member repair shop in your area. Click here to find out more about your car’s mobile A/C and engine cooling system.

Mobile A/C professionals should plan to attend 35th annual Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) Worldwide Training Conference and Trade Show, Meet me at MACS Make Connections that Matter, February 5-7, 2015 at the Caribe Royale, Orlando, FL.

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Better brush up on your heater repair knowledge!


According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA),

November was 16th coldest on record for the contiguous U.S.

Eastern U.S. was cold, while the Southwest was warm. The contiguous US snow cover extent was record large. Alaska had fifth warmest November on record.

During November, the average contiguous U.S. temperature was 39.3°F, which is 2.4°F below the 20th century average. This ranked as the 16th coldest November in the 1895-2014 record, and was the coldest November since 2000. The average contiguous U.S. precipitation was 2.07 inches, 0.16 inch below average, and ranked near the median value in the 120-year period of record.

If you’re a service professional and not a MACS member yet, you should be! Become a member and receive a technical newsletter with information like what you’ve just read in this blog post visit http://bit.ly/10zvMYg for more information.

You can E-mail us at macsworldwide@macsw.org . To locate a Mobile Air Conditioning Society member repair shop in your area. Click here to find out more about your car’s mobile A/C and engine cooling system.

Mobile A/C professionals should plan to attend 35th annual Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) Worldwide Training Conference and Trade Show, Meet me at MACS Make Connections that Matter, February 5-7, 2015 at the Caribe Royale, Orlando, FL.

 

Posted in Automotive, Automotive training | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

What do you know about the electric water pump?


Electric water pumps are not only more efficient than belt or chain-driven water pumps, but they can earn carbon credits toward Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE). Okay, electric pumps are nothing new as they have been used as auxiliary pumps for many, many years, to circulate coolant at low engine speeds for improved cabin heating, and even to provide some residual heating with the engine off (on some luxury cars, such as Mercedes).

But as the primary water pump on a mass-production, high-volume gasoline engine, an electric is somewhat new. It makes the most sense on a full hybrid, where it’s needed for the greater length of engine-off time (during idle stops). On a full hybrid, and along with an electric-drive A/C compressor and electric power steering, it also can contribute to eliminating the accessory belt. The Prius is an example.
But we’re going to see more and more electric pumps as the primary coolant-circulating pump on gasoline (or diesel) engines which are not hybrids, particularly when idle-stop systems come into greater use. The first prominent example is the 2.0-liter four-cylinder turbo on BMW, one example of where an electric water pump can keep coolant circulating through the turbo housing briefly, if necessary to cool the bearing. This engine came on stream first on the Z4, but now it’s migrating to the 3-Series and smaller models, so BMW can meet window sticker as well as CAFE.
The electric pump is computer-controlled, so it runs only when the coolant is at operating temperature. And because pump output is proportional to pump rpm, the computer just has to increase the current feed (or reduce it) as necessary to meet engine cooling requirements and cabin heating demand. The pump could be mounted anywhere in the engine compartment, and as you may have noted, indeed may be anywhere, such as at the cowl. However, the one on the BMW 2.0-turbo is at the right front bottom of the engine, exactly where it would be with a belt drive, but in this case, for convenient routing of hoses.

Jan Fig 18
What this means is that the water pump is now as electronic as the A/C. The circuit connections must be clean and tight, and although the coolant temperature sensor is an obvious computer input, so may be inputs from the electric fans circuit, cabin temperature sensors, even the outside air temperature sensor. So also expect to see a full menu of trouble code diagnostics and perhaps even a data item for pump rpm.
Of course, auxiliary water pumps can’t be ignored, and if you know they exist somewhere under the hood, you can put them on the “to-check” list whenever they can be expected to come on. In the case of a Mercedes with one, a quick check with the engine off and the pump running tells you it’s working. On the Dodge Durango (of the 2001- 2009 model year period), the pump comes on under these conditions: vehicle speed under 30 mph, coolant temperature from 50 degrees F up (to 230 degrees F), front blower turned on, rear system heat set above halfway (more than 60%), and no applicable trouble codes. If vehicle speed is above 30 mph, blower turned off or coolant temperature above 230 degrees F – ANY of these – the pump turns off.

There are two trouble codes for the circuit: BO107E – circuit voltage low, and B1080—circuit open. And as we noted in the October 2012 issue, the new Dodge Dart with the 1.4-liter turbo, a Fiat engine, also has an auxiliary electric pump, to circulate coolant through the turbo housing (to cool the bearing) when the engine is shut off.

If you’re a service professional and not a MACS member yet, you should be! Become a member and receive a technical newsletter with information like what you’ve just read in this blog post visit http://bit.ly/10zvMYg for more information.

You can E-mail us at macsworldwide@macsw.org . To locate a Mobile Air Conditioning Society member repair shop in your area. Click here to find out more about your car’s mobile A/C and engine cooling system.

Mobile A/C professionals should plan to attend 35th annual Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) Worldwide Training Conference and Trade Show, Meet me at MACS Make Connections that Matter, February 5-7, 2015 at the Caribe Royale, Orlando, FL.

Posted in Automotive Aftermarket, Automotive training, Hybrid, Mobile Air Conditioning | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Commercial vehicle sales keep rolling


From IHS

According to the IHS Quarterly Commercial Vehicle Report for September 2014, new commercial vehicle registrations for GVW 3-8 vehicles for the first nine months of the 2014 calendar year were 488,966 units and represented an increase of 13.9% over the 429,451 new units registered during the same period in the 2013 calendar year. Importantly, new registrations in the nine-month period are almost double the level reported during the first nine months of the 2009 calendar year. The strong performance in the first nine months of the calendar year was aided by an 18.9% increase in new registrations of GVW 8 vehicles.

IHS also reports, a example of just how strong the market is for GVW 3-8 vehicles, new registrations during the third quarter of the 2014 calendar year were 176,632 units and they represented the highest level of new registrations of GVW 3-8 vehicles in any quarter since the third quarter of the 2006 calendar year. New registrations in the third quarter of the 2014 calendar year were up 15.5% from the same quarter in the 2013 calendar year.

New registrations in the most recent quarter reflect the strong order and production schedules that have been reported by manufacturers. The significant increase in new registrations of GVW 3-8 vehicles during the quarter resulted from a 22.3% increase in GVW 8 new registrations from the comparable quarter in the 2013 calendar year. New GVW 8 registrations of 59,327 units were the strongest since the last quarter of the 2006 calendar year when GVW 8 new registrations were 64,332 units and were highly influenced by the push to obtain units prior to the change in diesel emission standards.

GVW 8 new registrations in the quarter were highly influenced by the registrations of new units by fleets operating 500+ units.

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In a typical reporting period, either GVW 3 or GVW 8 vehicles will be the largest volume GVW and these two GVWs will foster the most conversation and analysis. However, another way to look at the performance of new registrations is to look at it in three buckets: GVW 3, GVWs 4-7 and GVW 8. This type of aggregation makes sense since GVW 3 vehicles are primarily heavy pick-ups and vans and GVW 8 vehicles are primarily long and medium conventional tractors. In GVWs 4-7 there is a wide variety of straight-trucks and chassis that get modified to meet the needs of various vocational applications.

When the market was at record levels in the 2006 calendar year and during the decline and bottoming in the 2009 calendar year, GVW 4-7 new registrations during the first nine months of each calendar year represented the largest group of new registrations. Once the market started to recover, the three groups had mixed results depending on fleets that were in the market and the purchase behavior by rental and leasing companies.

During the first nine months of the 2014 calendar, each of the three GVW segments exceeded 150,000 new registrations for the first time since the 2006 calendar year. Additionally, the three segments were relatively close in overall volume as GVW 8 new registrations were only slightly better than the other two segments. While GVW 8 vehicles may be leading the market’s strengthening during the 2014 calendar year, the market’s improvement is the result of a strong performance in each of these three segments. 

If you’re a service professional and not a MACS member yet, you should be! Become a member and receive a technical newsletter with information like what you’ve just read in this blog post visit http://bit.ly/10zvMYg for more information.

You can E-mail us at macsworldwide@macsw.org . To locate a Mobile Air Conditioning Society member repair shop in your area. Click here to find out more about your car’s mobile A/C and engine cooling system.

Mobile A/C professionals should plan to attend 35th annual Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) Worldwide Training Conference and Trade Show, Meet me at MACS Make Connections that Matter, February 5-7, 2015 at the Caribe Royale, Orlando, FL.

 

Posted in Automotive, Mobile Air Conditioning, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

HC refrigerants explode in truck cabin


By Elvis Hoffpauir, MACS president and chief operating officer

VASA, which represents mobile A/C, electrical and cooling system professionals in Australia and New Zealand, has long sounded warnings about the potential dangers of using hydrocarbons in mobile air conditioning systems not designed for flammable refrigerants.

The organization recently reported the results of an independent investigation into an April 28 truck explosion in Perth that injured two occupants when hydrocarbon refrigerant ignited in the passenger cabin. It was reported that the truck had been retrofitted with hydrocarbon refrigerant as part of a major air conditioning system overhaul.

The investigation was conducted by the Government of Western Australia (WA) gas regulator EnergySafety on behalf of Worksafe WA. VASA cites an excerpt from EnergySafety’s 123-page report which states: “This report firmly recommends a temporary halt to the use of hydrocarbon refrigerants in any conversions fixed and mobile until revised and improved safety measures are put in place.”

An introductory paragraph of the report states that “In general the introduction of HC [refrigerants] has occurred without implementing major improvements or modifications of design philosophies of equipment and plant to deal with flammability issues,” and goes on to highlight the fact that “there are no known suppliers of equipment certified for use with HC refrigerants available from reputable manufacturers of compressors, TX valves, hoses, pressure switches and relief valves.”

According to the report, the driver and passenger of the truck saw “smoke” moments before the blast. Investigators say the “rapid discharge of liquid/saturated [refrigerant] vapor would have looked like a mist/fog or smoke and caused turbulent mixing with the air.”

The truck’s occupants reportedly suffered second- and third-degree burns, and exited the vehicle while it was still in motion. “Once the driver and passenger were outside, others present assisted in putting objects in front of the wheels to prevent the vehicle rolling away,” says the report. “Had the vehicle been travelling at speed the consequences could have been far worse … the driver was dealing with an explosion in his cabin and this could easily have resulted in a collision and further dire consequences.”

VASA reports that “Investigators found the diaphragm of the truck’s TX valve had separated from the main body, a rare occurrence that the manufacturer of the failed valve … told investigators would have required pressure exceeding 4.45MPa.

 

According to VASA, “investigators found the reason why the system’s pressure got high enough to rupture the valve and cause an explosion – a non-operational condenser fan … Resulting from the lack of suitable pressure switch or relief valve, the truck’s air conditioning compressor was uncontrolled once the condenser fan stopped working and with the runaway build-up of pressure ultimately reached the point where the TX valve became the weakest link and failed.”

 

“The TX valve’s location behind the truck’s dashboard allowed refrigerant to enter the cabin at high pressure.” The report says, “a propane/air mixture requires just 0.2 millijoules to ignite, less than the spark energy from a person’s fingertips when getting out of a vehicle on a cold day.”

 

For more of their report, check out the following links on the VASA website:

 

http://www.vasa.org.au/perth-truck-blast-probe-recommends-temporary-hc-refrigerant-ban/

 

http://www.vasa.org.au/perth-truck-hc-explosion-how-it-happened/

 

 

 

Posted in #off road vehicles, Automotive, Mobile Air Conditioning, Refrigerants, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

580 Super L door seals


By Chris Tyson, MACS HD Technical Contributor
We have an older Case backhoe at our shop that definitely sees its fair share of use out on job sites. In fact, I was operating this machine a few weeks ago when I noticed the HVAC system was performing rather poorly.

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Our BH-2 Super L is one of our most often used job site workhorses.
I really noticed how bad it was once the weather started to get cold here in Pennsylvania. I was digging out a trench and had the controls set to high temp and high blower speed. Everything seemed fine while I was operating the machine and actually doing the dig. But when I would stop for a few minutes, the cabin seemed to get cold right away.

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The door seal on this backhoe is crushed and deteriorated.
At first it seemed like the heater was just not putting out enough heat, but even at idle the fan was blowing strong and the air was hot. But while I was looking around the cabin, I noticed something at the bottom of the door.

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The gap around this door is so large you can see right down to the ground.

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One of our suppliers carries lengths of an extra large, “D-shaped” weather stripping seal.

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Additional weather strip helps keep out the cold (and keep in the heat).

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Special adhesive sealant is required for proper installation.
Have a similar story you’d like to share with MACS? Drop a line to steve@macsw.org and let us know!

If you’re a service professional and not a MACS member yet, you should be! Become a member and receive a technical newsletter with information like what you’ve just read in this blog post visit http://bit.ly/10zvMYg for more information.
You can E-mail us at macsworldwide@macsw.org . To locate a Mobile Air Conditioning Society member repair shop in your area. Click here to find out more about your car’s mobile A/C and engine cooling system.
Mobile A/C professionals should plan to attend 35th annual Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) Worldwide Training Conference and Trade Show, Meet me at MACS Make Connections that Matter, February 5-7, 2015 at the Caribe Royale, Orlando, FL.

Posted in #off road vehicles, Automotive, Electrical/Electronic, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment