No Heat? No Problem! WT?


By Steve Schaeber, MACS Technical Editor

Ugghh!! Every technician knows that feeling of simultaneous joy and sorrow when they diagnose a no heat condition being caused by a clogged or plugged up heater core. Sometimes it’s a pretty easy test, particularly when the hose going in is hot and the hose coming out is cold. This makes us happy because we can confidently report our findings to the customer, knowing the primary solution is to replace that faulty heat exchanger. At the same time though, we lament the thought of having to do the job, particularly when it’s one of those labor intensive replacements that can sometimes take several hours or even days to complete. The money’s great, but still…

Ugghh!!

That must have been exactly what this guy thought when he found a similar problem with the heater core in his 1999 Ford E-150 work van. We’re not sure, but financial issues may have also come into play in this situation.

The repair approach (while not recommended) is still an interesting one, although certainly not the most efficient way to go. Better options are out there, but for now, let’s just take a look at what was done.

Heater core issues were chilling the driver of this 1999 Ford E-150 work van.

Heater core issues were chilling the driver of this
1999 Ford E-150 work van.

To avoid the arduous dashboard R&R, the heater hoses going to the core were simply cut.

To avoid the arduous dashboard R&R, the heater hoses going to the core were simply cut.

 

Tapping into those heater hoses, PEX lines were attached and ran through a hole notched into the doghouse cover.

Tapping into those heater hoses, PEX lines were attached and ran
through a hole notched into the doghouse cover.

To help regulate the flow of coolant (and thereby the heat available to the cabin), this manually controlled regulator valve is installed inline along a section of the PEX tubing.

To help regulate the flow of coolant (and thereby the heat available to the cabin), this manually controlled regulator valve is installed inline along a section of the PEX tubing.

 

 Two pieces of plastic electrical conduit help the PEX tubing make that critical bend up onto the dashboard, while also protecting it from damage in the door jamb area. A zip tie attached to the side window vent secures the assembly in place, while electrical tape fastens the supply and return lines together.

Two pieces of plastic electrical conduit help the PEX tubing make that critical bend up onto the dashboard, while also protecting it from damage in the door jamb area. A zip tie attached to the side window vent secures the assembly in place, while electrical tape fastens the supply and return lines together.

One big loop runs along the surface of the dashboard, intended to provide heat for defrosting

One big loop runs along the surface of the dashboard, intended to provide heat for defrosting

A loop around the driver’s seat…

A loop around the driver’s seat…

 …and another around the passenger seat and between the seats.

…and another around the passenger seat and between the seats.

As mentioned above, we don’t know all the details behind this repair, but did learn that this red oxygen barrier type of PEX tubing (which was left over from a prior job) is commonly used in building construction, particularly when installing radiant heat systems into newly poured concrete floors. The thought behind this job was that if PEX tubing works well in concrete, it should also work in a van.

Apparently it didn’t work out as planned though, because after driving the van for a few days it was found that not much heat would radiate off the tubing. Further modifications would be needed to actually get heat to flow. No, the heater core still wasn’t replaced, but rather an auxiliary heater unit salvaged from an old dump truck was installed, which finally did provide warm air.

Tapping into the PEX tubing between the two seats, this auxiliary heater unit receives the flow of coolant intended for the in-dash heater core. Attaching it to the van’s divider cage with a bungee cord allows for up and down movement of the assembly to direct airflow in various positions.

Tapping into the PEX tubing between the two seats, this auxiliary heater unit receives the flow of coolant intended for the in-dash heater core. Attaching it to the van’s divider cage with a bungee cord allows for up and down movement of the assembly to direct airflow in various positions.

Standard worm drive hose clamps were used to secure the PEX tubing to the heater. Also shown is the blower motor, which rests against the cage

Standard worm drive hose clamps were used to secure the PEX tubing to the heater. Also shown is the blower motor, which rests against the cage

Supplying the blower motor with current, this standard wall switch is installed in the van’s ceiling at the dome light hole, secured with 1” Phillips head drywall screws.

Supplying the blower motor with current, this standard wall switch is installed in the van’s ceiling at the dome light hole, secured with 1” Phillips head drywall screws.

Just for the heck of it, we checked with an online service information provider to find out what’s involved with replacing the heater core in a similar vehicle. We found a list price for a replacement core at around $250, with an estimated labor time of around 2 hours. Not too bad for a heater core, as some of them can take much longer.

Now for the disclaimer: The author of this BLOG has personal knowledge of this van and its owner, and although he wasn’t involved in the repair, he finds it fascinating to look at the things people do and to ask them “what were you thinking”? MACS nor the author recommends, condones nor participates in repairs of this nature, and ALWAYS recommends ALL repairs be performed in accordance with OEM vehicle manufacturer recommendations, service manuals, methods, procedures and/or bulletins.

What was the last crazy repair you saw? Do you know about similar repair attempts that were made? Why not share them with MACS! Send us your story, and it might just end up here on our MACS WordPress BLOG! Visit our website www.macsw.org for more information, or send an email to steve@macsw.org and let us know about it.

Posted in Automotive, Automotive Aftermarket, Automotive training, Mobile Air Conditioning | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The app for MACS 2016 Training Event is Available


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Download the MACS 2016 Training Event and Trade Show app from your app store for iphone or Android. Don’t come to Orlando without it!

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AASP holds MACS Section 609 Certification Class


By Steve Schaeber,  MACS Technical Editor

Twenty-one shop owners and service technicians from Berks, Chester and Montgomery Counties attended a MACS Section 609 Certification class held at the Landis Creek Golf Club in Limerick, PA on Wednesday, January 13, 2016. Hosted by AASP-PA (the Alliance of Automotive Service Providers of Pennsylvania) at their regular monthly meeting, the event was coordinated by Ken Seal, AASP’s field director for eastern PA.

AASP-PA hosted a MACS Section 609 Certification class at Landis Creek Golf Club in Limerick, PA.

AASP-PA hosted a MACS Section 609 Certification class at Landis Creek Golf Club in Limerick, PA.

Class was held in the Eagle Room at Landis Creek, and before things got started, a few of us stepped outside to check out the view. This town is well known in Southeastern PA as the home of a nuclear power plant, the Limerick Generating Station. Since it’s winter time, the bare trees make it possible to see one of the cooling towers.

The 9th green is located just behind the restaurant, from which there is a clear winter view of one of the nuclear power plant’s cooling towers, but it’s the enormous water vapor clouds that really catch your eye.

The 9th green is located just behind the restaurant, from which there is a clear winter view of one of the nuclear power plant’s cooling towers, but it’s the enormous water vapor clouds that really catch your eye.

Once everyone arrived and dinner was ordered and served, short presentations were given by Ken Seal (AASP), Dan Warner (New Auto Solutions), Rhonda Green (Hart Insurance) and Steve Schaeber (Mobile Air Conditioning Society).

 

The evening kicked off with presentations by Ken Seal (AASP) and Dan Warner (New Auto Solutions).

The evening kicked off with presentations by Ken Seal (AASP) and Dan Warner (New Auto Solutions)’

Caption 4: New Auto Solutions is a distributor of CPS Automotive equipment; Dan discussed several machines, including their newest FX3030 dual refrigerant R/R/R machines.

Figure 4 - DSC_9000

New Auto Solutions is a distributor of CPS Automotive equipment; Dan discussed several machines, including their newest FX3030 dual refrigerant R/R/R machines.

Section 609 Certification and Training is a requirement for all technicians by the EPA under the US Clean Air Act. To become certified, technicians must pass a test demonstrating their knowledge in the use of refrigerant recovery / recycling equipment, the EPA’s regulatory requirements, the importance of refrigerant containment and the effects of ozone depletion and environmental change. The Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) Worldwide created the first technician certification program, and since 1990 has helped over one million technicians achieve this certification.

Tonight’s training was conducted by Tim Iezzi, owner and lead technician at Iezzi’s Auto Service in Reading, PA. Tim’s shop has been a member of MACS since 1985, and he also holds the positions of secretary and delegate for AASP-PA’s Berks County Chapter # 23.  Tim has been a MACS proctor since 2014, and he’ll also be presenting his inaugural class at the upcoming MACS 2016 Training Event and Trade Show in Orlando. Entitled Thermodynamics for Auto Mechanics, his class will explore the laws of thermodynamics and how they apply to modern vapor compression refrigeration systems. Visit www.macsw.org and click on 2016 Training Event for more information.

Figure 6 - DSC_9018 Tim Iezzi proctored his second MACS Section 609 Certification training class for AASP on January 13th.

Figure 7 - DSC_9025

Before passing out the closed book, 25 question test, instructors often ask sample questions to help the group prepare.

Are you involved in your local shop owner’s or technician’s association? Have you signed up yet to become a member of MACS?

Do you want to find out more about what programming may be available in your area? Drop a line to steve@macsw.org and we’ll look into what’s around! Just like MACS does for its members, local groups and associations can help technicians and shop owners with training, education, suppliers and other information to help their businesses grow and succeed. Learn more about AASP-PA at www.aasp-pa.org or check out www.macsw.org for more information.

 

 

Posted in #1234yf, Automotive, Automotive Aftermarket, MACS Member, Mobile Air Conditioning, Refrigerants, Training | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Toyota delivers their first R-1234yf vehicles to dealers


 

By Steve Schaeber, MACS Technical Editor

We first heard the news back in the fall of 2015 that Toyota would be shipping their first vehicles containing the A/C refrigerant R-1234yf to dealerships in the US, and they’re just now starting to arrive, although not yet in large numbers. In fact only one can be found at Team Toyota, one of the company’s largest dealers in the Philadelphia market. During an interview discussing A/C service on these newly redesigned vehicles, we spoke with service manager and MACS member Jim Montella, who took us out into the shop to see their new equipment.

Figure 1 - DSC_9056 Jim Montella Team Toyota - Copy

Standing with their new R-1234yf A/C machine is MACS member Jim Montella, service manager at Team Toyota in Langhorne, PA.

“At a recent Ride-and-Drive event, we learned that the redesigned Tacoma would come with R-1234yf refrigerant,” remarked Montella following a MACS Section 609 Certification class held at their Langhorne, PA service center. “The Prius should be arriving with it next.”

Figure 2 - DSC_9067 Robinair R-1234yf Team Toyota - Copy

Branded with Toyota, Lexus and Scion logos, this SAE J2843 certified Robinair R/R/R machine is manufactured by Bosch Automotive Service Solutions.

Jim mentioned that they had just received their new Robinair machine back in October, and have yet to use it on a vehicle. We also checked with the parts department, and they don’t yet have any yf refrigerant in stock, although they’re expecting it to arrive soon. Same goes for the Tacoma; they’ve only the one in stock right now, but more are on the way, and they’re expecting to see yf in other models too in the upcoming year. “It’s just the Prius and Tacoma right now, but any new body that comes out after 2016 will have it.”

Taking a look at the machine itself, Jim showed us that it has an OBD-II connector, making it possible to track by VIN how much refrigerant you remove from and put back into a particular car. It’s also capable of printing out a record of each service that can be attached to the repair order.

When we visited Team Toyota to see the 2016 Tacoma SR5, it had already been through new car prep, transferred out of the service department and up the road to the showroom; new car sales manager Rob McGinley showed us the way.

Figure 3 - DSC_9159 2016 Tacoma @ Team Toyota - Copy

The newest vehicle platform to arrive at Team Toyota is the 2016 Tacoma SR5; they don’t expect it to hang around for too long.

Much of the A/C system looks similar to prior Tacoma models. In fact, while many R-1234yf vehicles use an ILHX (inline heat exchanger) to improve the efficiency of the new refrigerant, this vehicle does not have one. Right up front you can see that the condenser is quite large, and is perhaps the reason why an ILHX is not necessary.

Figure 4 - S2720002 2016 Tacoma Condenser

The new Tacoma’s condenser is quite large, taking up much of the available space to maximize airflow and heat transfer.

The underhood label shows that this vehicle uses 510 grams or 17.9897 ounces of refrigerant (let’s just round it off at 18). Plus or minus 30 grams is equal to 1.05822 ounces, so again let’s round that off to one ounce. For years we’ve been taught that A/C system tolerance is around ± 10%, but that’s certainly not the case here. Overcharging by 10% would be 1.8 ounces, almost a whole ounce more than allowed! Undercharging by 10% is similar, making it important to accurately charge vehicles either with a stand-alone scale or with an accurate R/R/R machine.

Figure 5 - DSC_9087 - Copy

The J639 underhood label on the 2016 Tacoma shows it uses R-1234yf refrigerant along with PS-D1, an Idemitsu compressor oil.

You can also find out more about the 2016 Toyota Tacoma by visiting www.toyota.com and clicking on TRUCKS.

Learn more about R-1234yf recovery equipment as all the manufacturers display at the 2016 MACS Training Event & Trade Show, coming up next week in Orlando, FL.

Visit www.macsw.org to get the details!

 

Posted in #1234yf, Automotive, Automotive Aftermarket, MACS Member, MACS Training Event, Mobile Air Conditioning, Refrigerants, Training | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

R-1234yf at the 2016 PHL Auto Show


By Steve Schaeber, MACS Technical Editor

Over the next several years as vehicle manufacturers refresh older nameplates and begin to introduce new ones, we’re expecting to see more and more platforms change over to the new refrigerant R-1234yf. While many independent service shops won’t likely see these vehicles in their shops for A/C service within the first few years that they’re on the street, they will indeed be performing other services on these cars and light trucks, such as oil changes and tire rotations, along with other periodic maintenance and repairs. Our advice to shop owners and technicians: get to know these new systems now, check them out when they come into your shop, and start drawing comparisons to the R-134a systems you already know. In some cases the changes are only slight, but in many the OEMs are doing things a bit differently and you’ll want to take notice.

Figure 1 - S2770049

Caption 1: Although still filling the A/C system with R-134a, GM is starting to incorporate “yf” parts (such as this suction hose manufactured by MACS member Continental) into several models, including the 2016 Chevrolet Spark. Other parts like compressors may also be “yf rated” as indicated on their markings or labels.

January 29, 2016 was Media Day at the 115th annual Philadelphia Auto Show held at the Pennsylvania Convention Center, and MACS was there to survey the new models and find out what changes are being implemented with the newest A/C systems. We already know that FCA (Fiat Chrysler Automobiles) has been the first OEM to install yf on a large scale amongst most of its models, and in 2016 they’re continuing to include even more vehicles.

Figure 2 - DSC_0443

Caption 2: Jeep Wrangler is one of the newest FCA vehicles to be filled with the refrigerant HFO-1234yf.

In the 2014 MACS Mobile A/C Update, we reported that FCA started using the substitute in 7 of its products. That number increased to 11 for the 2015 Update, and now it’s even bigger this time around. We counted 18 FCA models with yf at this year’s auto show, and not every vehicle flavor they offer was on display. There were of course a few newcomers, such as the Dodge Durango and Dodge Journey, and we also saw yf in several versions of the Jeep Wrangler for the first time. Another model now being filled with the gas is the Fiat 500, and while we saw yf in the 500X last year (which is built in Italy on the same platform as the Jeep Renegade), this was the first time we saw it in the smallest of their products.

Figure 3 - DSC_0617 2016 Fiat 500e Concept Water Bros

Caption 3: FCA is even installing yf into vehicles you can’t yet (or may not be able to) purchase, such as this 500e “Water Bros” concept car. Nice stripe!

Last year we also saw HFO-1234yf employed in a few of the JLR (Jaguar Land Rover) vehicles, such as the Range Rover and Range Rover Sport, but the only Jaguar we could find then was the F-Type. This year is a whole other story however, as each of the 14 JLR products on the show floor contained the alternative refrigerant.

Figure 4 - DSC_0517 2016 Jaguar XJL

Caption 4: The 2016 Jaguar XJL is one of the newest JLR products to adopt yf.

Following the Ford press conference, which is the opening event at the Philadelphia Auto Show, I had the opportunity to speak with Rick Woytowich, Ford’s parts and service operations manager for the Philadelphia region. While none of the products they had on display were filled with the refrigerant, Ford does have plans to release its first R-1234yf vehicle later this spring. “The first vehicle that’s coming out in April is the 2017 Escape. However, we are accelerating our whole roll out because in Europe, all 2017 model vehicles have to have it.” Rick went on to explain that we’re mandated to use something other than R-134a by 2021 here in the US, and that in addition to Ford, other manufacturers are also accelerating. “As every new product comes out, or with every new refresh, they’re converting over.”

Rick also mentioned that current systems cannot be retrofitted, meaning you can’t take R-1234yf and install it into older vehicles. “The ones that are R-134a have to stay R-134a.” He further commented that when it comes to performing service in the shop, “Just like we went from R-12 to R-134a, there’s going to be unique fittings and unique equipment that are only compatible with yf.”

Figure 5 - 17FordEscape-Titanium_01_HR (1)

Caption 5: Due out later this spring, the 2017 Escape will be Ford’s first yf production vehicle.

We weren’t allowed to take any pictures under the hood because the vehicle has not yet been officially released, but we were given a sneak peak at the 2016 Cadillac CT6, due out later this year. Unveiled last April at the 2015 New York International Auto Show, it’s being built at GM’s Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly plant on Cadillac’s exclusive new “Omega Platform” and will be their second ever production vehicle to be filled with the HFO (hydrofluoroolefin) refrigerant. Available A/C systems may involve single or dual evaporators (to accommodate an available quad-zone ATC system), which of course has an effect on the system’s total refrigerant charge amount.

Figure 6 - DSC_9277 2016 Cadillac CT6

Caption 6: The 2016 CT6 is the second Cadillac vehicle being filled with R-1234yf refrigerant.

With over 700 vehicles under one roof, we simply didn’t have enough time to check out every OEM on display. But with a must-see list in hand, we hit the majors including Chevrolet, GMC, Toyota, Scion, VW, Kia, Honda, Nissan, Acura, FCA and Volvo, and even had time to check out Subaru, Hyundai, Mitsubishi, Mazda and Lincoln. Unfortunately we missed a few that we did get to see last year, like BMW, Mini, Audi and Infinity. The only manufacturer we saw in “Exotic Alley” was JLR, as we missed Porsche, Buick, Ferrari, Tesla, McLaren and Maserati, most of which were in eyes-only, roped off areas. We also missed show headliners Mercedes, Smart and Lexus, as they were in a completely different hall.

Figure 7 - DSC_0555 Lexus & Mercedes Old Train Shed

Caption 7: Looking down on the Mercedes, Smart and Lexus displays from the second floor of the Grand Hall, otherwise known as the “old train shed” of the former Reading Railroad terminal.

So what’s the bottom line? As we suspected, yf is definitely on the move, although just starting to pick up the pace as we saw it being used by 9 of the 40 brands on display. Below is a list of all the yf vehicles we found in Philadelphia, but we took our list one step further and enumerated the remaining FCA vehicles which are still being filled with R-134a.

GM (General Motors Company LLC):

2016 Cadillac CT6

2016 Cadillac XTS

 

JLR (Jaguar Land Rover Automotive):

2016 Jaguar F-Pace

2016 Jaguar F-Type

2016 Jaguar XE

2016 Jaguar XF

2016 Jaguar XJ

2016 Jaguar XJL

2016 Land Rover Discovery Sport HSE

2016 Land Rover LR4 HSE

2016 Land Rover Range Rover Evoque

2016 Land Rover Range Rover HSE

2016 Land Rover Range Rover Sport HSE

 

TMC (Toyota Motor Corporation):

2016 Toyota Tacoma SR5

2016 Toyota Tacoma Limited

2016 Toyota Tacoma TRD 4×4 Off-Road

 

FCA (Fiat Chrysler Automobiles):

2016 Chrysler 200

2016 Chrysler 300

2016 Dodge Challenger

2016 Dodge Charger

2016 Dodge Dart

2016 Dodge Durango

2016 Dodge Journey

2016 Fiat 500

2016 Fiat 500 Abarth

2016 Fiat 500c Cabrio

2016 Fiat 500e Concept

2016 Fiat 500L

2016 Fiat 500X

2016 Jeep Cherokee

2016 Jeep Grand Cherokee Diesel

2016 Jeep Renegade

2016 Ram 1500 Big Horn

2016 Ram 1500 Limited

 

FCA Vehicles still using R-134a:

2016 Chrysler Town & Country (Still R-134a)

2016 Dodge Grand Caravan (Still R-134a)

2016 Jeep Compass

2016 Jeep Patriot

2016 Ram ProMaster City Wagon

2016 Ram 2500 ProMaster Cargo Van

2016 Ram 2500 Power Wagon

 

Note: Current regulations only permit the use of R-1234yf refrigerant in passenger cars and light duty trucks. Although Ram 2500 Series trucks do not fall into this category, and therefore still use refrigerant 134a, they are included here to complete the list of inspected vehicles.

 

Have you been to your local auto show to check out the new models? Have you noticed something extraordinary about an A/C system you’ve seen in your shop? Share it with MACS, and your story may just end up here on the MACS WordPress BLOG! Visit www.macsw.org for more information, and if you’re not yet a member, join today!

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Some scenes from the Philly Auto Show


MACS staff attended press day at the Philadelphia Auto Show on Friday, January 29, 2016. here are a few of their favorite rides.

 

PAS_0476

Slick new Fiat Convertible

PAS_0592

Dodge Challenger

PAS_0555

PAS_0537

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Come to a free Section 609 Training Class


Attend a Free Section 609 Class and Take the Test

During MACS 2016 Training Event and Trade Show, at the Caribe Royale in Orlando, FL- Friday, February 12, 2016 from 1pm-3pm, attend MACS’ newest Section 609 Certification Training Class, covering the most up-do-date material available.

But this class is not just for newbies. If you’re already a certification instructor, here’s a chance to see how MACS does it!

We’ll present the entire 609 clinic, after which you’ll have an opportunity to actually take the paper-and-pencil version of the test. We’ll expedite your results, and if successful, you can say you became Section 609 Certified at MACS 2016!

Sec6092015BookCover.

This will take place in the Learning Pod at MACS 2016 Trade Show, come early or stay late and see the show.

The Free Section 609 Class will be held, Friday, February 12, 2016, 1-3pm in the Convention Center of Caribe Royale Hotel and Convention Center, 8101 World Center Drive Orlando, FL.

The class and test are free but you must register.

Call the MACS office at 215-631-7020 x 0

Or download the paper form and fax to 215-631-7017

or email to

info@macsw.org

 

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See who is exhibiting at MACS 2016 Training Event and Trade Show


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What is a learning pod?


This year’s MACS Training Event and Trade Show is going to include a new feature that we hope you’ll like. It’s called the Learning Pod, and it’s a new venue for holding training classes. It’s going to be located directly behind the MACS booth, right out on the Trade Show floor.

 

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Each year MACS holds an EPA Section 609 Certification Training class, which has historically been held on Saturday afternoon in one of the regular session classrooms. MACS offers this training at no charge to attendees, and it’s a chance to become Section 609 certified through MACS while you’re spending some time with us in Orlando. But this year we wanted to try something different, considering all of the headlines and changes that have been going on in the industry, particularly with the EU, EPA, various regulations, refrigerants, and so on. That’s why we decided to bring 609 right into the main event; right into the trade show!

In addition to our regularly scheduled 609 Certification class, we’ll use the Learning Pod to present the following two exclusive 609 classes, which were created specifically for MACS 2016 as part of our Train-the-Trainer series. They’ll be offered back-to-back in the Learning Pod from 11am-12pm on Friday, February 12th.

Designed with MACS Trainers in mind, 609 Behind-the-Scenes will be a unique opportunity to see what happens here at MACS during each stage of the 609 certification process. From signing up to become a MACS trainer, to ordering tests and materials, this class will also cover proper paperwork handling, account maintenance and payment procedures. We’ll also review how to access our online training options, as well as how to get a reprint of your credentials.

Next we’ll present What’s New with 609, an opportunity for current trainers to see what MACS has incorporated into the newest program, as compared to the traditional version which was offered prior to 2015. We’ll cover some new refrigerants and why they were included, as well as specific EPA rules that have recently been added to the program. If you’re a current MACS instructor, you won’t want to miss this class!

For those who are not yet certified, don’t worry; we’ve got a class for you! From 1pm-3pm, the Learning Pod will feature MACS’ newest Section 609 Certification Training Class, covering the most up-do-date material available. But this class is not just for newbies. If you’re already a certification instructor, here’s a chance to see how MACS does it! We’ll present the entire 609 clinic, after which you’ll have an opportunity to actually take the paper-and-pencil version of the test. We’ll expedite your results, and if successful, you can say you became Section 609 Certified at MACS 2016!

The Learning Pod will bring a new dimension to MACS 2016, and we’re excited about combining the Training Event and Trade Show in a new way. See you in Orlando!

To register for the Section 609 class call 215-631-7020.

Visit MACS website at www.macsw.org

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The Next Generation


The theme of MACS 2016 Training Event and Trade Show, February 11-13 is, Mobile A/C: The Next Generation.

Verticallogomediaum

Why did we pick this theme? Because in 2015 we looked around and saw many bright young people taking leadership roles in MACS member companies and lots of young technically minded folks filling the classrooms for our technical training.

This generational shift is an excellent sign for the Mobile Air Conditioning Society and our future growth. Not only are there young faces, many more faces are female and there are also second and third generation MACS members now in attendance.

It is important as the next generation become leaders we share with them the history and purpose of MACS as a 501(c)6 non-profit and why it was founded in 1981. For instance, The Refrigerant Recovery and Recycling Program developed by MACS to meet requirements under Section 609 of the Clean Air Act was formally approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) effective August 13, 1992, 30 days after the publication of the final rule. At that time, the EPA advised MACS that all individuals voluntarily trained under the program since its inception would be considered properly trained and certified.

Through the years, MACS has led the way and developed and expanded the certification program to reflect industry changes in technology, service equipment and procedures, tools, alternative refrigerants and regulatory requirements.
At the heart of the MACS mission is technician training. MACS has kept pace with technology by developing and adapting training programs to meet the needs of technicians in the field through our Annual Training Event, our Mobile A/C Update field clinics and our regional heavy duty clinics.

Another part of MACS mission is facilitating business between all segments of the industry.

That is why we have our Annual Trade Show and one of the reasons we produce award-winning ACTION magazine. As the leading provider of Section 609 certification MACS has compiled over one million certification records of businesses and individuals who perform mobile A/C repairs and this data helps build the ACTION magazine mailing list.

While we celebrate The Next Generation of leaders to our industry, we also welcome more new technology becoming a part of our standard operating procedures. When you attend MACS 2016 Training Event and Trade Show you’ll learn a great deal about new ways of doing things from service and repair to how to run your business more efficiently.

Register now at MACS website www.macsw.org

Hope to see you in Orlando!

wishCR

Make hotel reservations at Caribe Royale in Orlando by calling 888-258-7501

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