Repeat blower motor issue


By Steve Schaeber, MACS Technical Editor

An old boss of mine used to have a saying that goes something like: I ain’t got time to be doing the same thing two and three times! In fact, I can still picture him saying this to me in his (somewhat impatient) North Carolina accent! Of course he was talking about the frustration of having to do a job over and over again because for some (usually simple) reason, things didn’t go right the first time.

Many technicians know this frustration all too well. After completing a repair on a customer’s vehicle, there’s not a much worse experience than a return visit from the vehicle’s owner voicing the same or a similar concern. This is especially frustrating if they’ve been back more than once. But sometimes no matter how much time and effort we put into diagnostics, repairs can keep recurring for us to tackle yet again until we get it right.

Owners of certain MINI vehicles produced from September 1, 2011, including models R55 thru R61 (the Clubman, Hardtop, Convertible, Coupe, Roadster, Countryman and Paceman, respectively) may complain that the blower motor does not operate at any fan speed, while others might say it works intermittently when set to full speed. This can happen with the controls set to either heat or A/C.

Issues such as these usually lead a technician down the road of testing and ultimately replacing the blower motor resistor or control module.  This is the device responsible for applying the correct voltage to the blower motor, based on driver input from the vehicle’s manual 4-stage fan setting on the IHKS (Integrated Heating/Air Conditioning) controls. But when these blower motor resistors are being replaced too often, further investigation is necessary.

To alert technicians of t its findings, BMW has issued TSB # SI M64 02 15, which describes how the blower motor may be faulty, causing the blower resistor to fail. They advise replacing the blower motor unit and the blower motor resistor at the same time to avoid a repeat customer visit for a blower issue.

MACS has often recommended that technicians make checking for TSBs a part of their routine diagnostic procedures. Too often we come across situations when an unexpected defective part is the actual root cause of a problem, while blame is placed on another component. Unfortunately these TSB checks don’t always take place, although it makes sense. Blower motor resistors were known for many years to be items that sometimes fail, and so it’s not unheard of to make a diagnostic call such as this.

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In  an era of instant access to technical information via the web, we think it’s worth taking the time to double check those TSBs. Doing so might help you to avoid a  customer comeback.

Note: Which TSBs have helped you find and fix those troublesome HVAC issues? Drop a line to steve@macsw.org and share your story with the MACS community!

Posted in #1234yf, Electrical/Electronic, MACS Member, Mobile Air Conditioning, Training | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

US EPA, US DOT, California’s Air Resources Board Issue Draft Technical Assessment Report of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Fuel Economy Standards for Model Year 2022-2025 Cars and Light Trucks


 The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the California Air Resource Board (CARB) today took the first step in the mid-term evaluation of the National Program for greenhouse gas emissions and fuel economy standards for light duty cars and trucks by releasing a draft Technical Assessment Report (TAR) for public comment.  The release of the TAR delivers on a commitment that EPA made in 2012 as part of the rulemaking establishing a National Program for the 2017-2025 period.  The draft TAR covers model years 2022-2025.

The draft TAR shows that automotive manufacturers are innovating and bringing new technology to market at a rapid pace, and that they will be able to meet the MY 2022-2025 standards established in the 2012 rulemaking with a wide range of cost-effective technologies.  Moreover, it indicates that these standards can be achieved by relying primarily on advanced gasoline vehicles.  The report also shows that manufacturers will be able to meet the stricter standards at similar or even a lower cost than was anticipated in the 2012 rulemaking, with substantial savings on fuel costs for consumers.

“Today’s draft report shows that automakers are developing far more technologies to improve fuel economy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, at similar or lower costs, than we thought possible just a few years ago.  And they are adopting these fuel-saving technologies into their fleets even faster than anticipated,” said Janet McCabe, acting assistant administrator for EPA’s Office of Air and Radiation.  “This is simply great news for consumers, manufacturers, workers and the climate.”

 

EPA News Release

“Automakers have already implemented new technologies that are saving American drivers money and cut national fuel consumption and carbon emissions today,” said National Highway Traffic Safety Administrator Dr. Mark Rosekind.  “The draft report supports that the administration’s fuel economy program can continue to incentivize innovation and reduce fuel consumption while also ensuring that consumers can continue to choose the vehicles they want to drive.  The agencies welcome public comments to assist the agencies’ analysis and decision making.”

“After almost four years of close collaboration on the draft Technical Assessment Report with our federal partners, the conclusions are clear: costs are lower for many technologies than we originally thought, market uptake is strong, and expected consumer benefits remain high,” said CARB Chair Mary D. Nichols.

The National Program is designed to enable consumers to choose the car or truck they want, while ensuring that the vehicles they select will reduce carbon emissions and save on fuel costs.  The program was developed jointly by the EPA and DOT, in coordination with CARB, and it applies to passenger cars and light duty trucks through model year 2025.  It requires manufacturers to improve average fuel efficiency and reduce average greenhouse gas emissions over time.

In recent years, and responding to the standards established in the National Program, automakers have been rapidly adopting fuel-efficient technologies like turbo charging, engine downsizing, more sophisticated transmissions, vehicle weight reduction, aerodynamics, and idle stop-start, along with improved accessories and air conditioning systems.  There are over 100 car, SUV, and pick-up truck versions on the market today that already meet 2020 or later standards, suggesting that automakers should be well-positioned to meet future average standards through additional application of those technologies.

Today’s draft report is the first of several steps the agencies will take as part of assessing the standards for new vehicles in the 2022-2025 model years (MY).  The report itself is not a rulemaking and does not change any of the existing requirements under the existing National Program.

The National Program does not set a single fuel economy target number for all vehicles, but instead it establishes separate footprint-based standards for passenger cars and light trucks.  A manufacturer’s compliance obligation depends on the mix of vehicles that it produces for sale in each model year – if a manufacturer produces mostly larger vehicles, its average standard will be less stringent than if it produces mostly smaller vehicles, reflecting the reality that smaller vehicles often have better fuel economy and lower carbon emissions than larger vehicles.  This approach ensures that consumers can continue to choose from the full range of fuel efficient vehicles on the market, and at the same time, it improves efficiency and emissions for all types of vehicles.

While the Draft TAR analysis focuses on the MY 2022-2025 standards, the report also shows that auto manufacturers over-complied with the standards for each of the first three years of the program, and in 2014 outperformed the standards by 1.4 miles per gallon.  This occurred during a period during which the automotive industry has seen six consecutive years of sales increases and a new all-time sales record in 2015, reflecting positive consumer response to vehicles complying with the standards.

For more information on today’s announcement, visit:  https://www3.epa.gov/otaq/climate/mte.htm

Posted in #1234yf, Environmental Protection Agency, Mobile Air Conditioning, Refrigerants | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Change is coming to heavy duty refrigerants


By Steve Schaeber, MACS manager of service training

Last year around this time the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finalized Rule # 20, which was a Change of Status Rule affecting several industrial sectors including MVAC (Motor Vehicle Air Conditioning). Specifically of interest to MACS members is the ban on R-134a for use in new, light-duty A/C systems beginning with Model Year 2021 vehicles.

If you’re concerned about whether this rule will affect how we service the existing fleet, don’t be. We’re talking about a phase-down on the use of R-134a, not a phase-out as we did with R-12 in the 1990’s. There are literally hundreds of millions of vehicles on the street today that use R-134a, which will still be available long into the future.

Prior to that, EPA Rule # 16 added R-1234yf to the SNAP (Significant New Alternatives Policy) list as a new substitute MVAC refrigerant. But when you read the fine print, you’ll find that it’s only allowed to be charged into certain light-duty vehicles, specifically those with a GVWR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating) of less than 8,500 pounds. This is why you’ll see the gas being used in the average passenger car, SUV and even some light trucks, but not in anything much bigger than those.

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Next SNAP Proposed Rule

In the works now is a new proposed rule, which is currently under interagency review. EPA is considering to propose listing HFO-1234yf as acceptable, subject to use conditions, for limited HD vehicle types, such as medium-duty passenger vehicles, HD pickup trucks and complete HD vans. If finalized, this rule would allow the use of yf in medium and heavy duty vehicles with a GVWR of between 8,500 and 14,000 pounds (Classes 2b and 3).

We think this proposed rule makes a lot of sense, too. After all, there are only minor differences in the size and configuration of the A/C systems between these vehicles as compared to their smaller counterparts. In fact, many of the bodies and cabs used to build these trucks are the same; it’s the chassis, frame and suspension that can really distinguishes them. As an example, what are the main differences between the A/C system of a Ford F-150 pickup truck and an F-550 Super Duty? For 2013, the refrigerant charge amounts only differed by about 4 ounces, likely due to variations in components or heat load amongst the engines. Let’s also compare two 2016 Chevys: The Silverado 1500’s GVWR is 6,500-7,200 lbs, while the 2500HD is 9,300-9,900 lbs. The 2500HD can’t use yf, even though they’re built on the same assembly line with nearly identical A/C systems.

Many technicians want to know why R-1234yf isn’t simply approved for use in all motor vehicles. The reason is that it hasn’t yet undergone all of the necessary risk assessments. For example, if you look into some of these larger Class 7 and 8 trucks, you find their A/C system size, usage patterns and operating characteristics are quite different from those used in passenger cars. It might technically be able to work, but there are a lot of variables that still need to be considered. Two other SNAP listed alternatives are listed as acceptable, subject to use conditions, in all new MVAC systems, including HD. These are CO2 (R-744) and HFC-152a.

Note: Stay tuned to macsw.org for the most up-to-date MVAC information!

Posted in #1234yf, #off road vehicles, ACtion Magazine, Mobile Air Conditioning, Refrigerants | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Servicing heavy duty truck, off-road and specialty vehicle A/C


By Robert Brocx

The heavy duty truck, off-road work machine and specialty vehicle mobile air conditioning (HD MAC) industry has typically utilized air conditioning standards, procedures and technologies developed by the automotive industry and SAE Interior Climate Control Standards Committee (ICCSC). With the auto industry’s implementation of new mobile air conditioning standards for service equipment, technician training and refrigerants including R-1234yf and R-744, it has become apparent that the HD MAC technician has a need for supplementary recommended procedures and training to address the differences between the two.

 

What are the primary differences that should be addressed?

  • Leak testing using vacuum and pressure decay: A fire truck A/C system can have an internal volume ten times greater than a car’s, yet the same service equipment and procedures are often used for both vehicles. The 1.5 cfm vacuum pump and preprogrammed vacuum and pressure decay rates on many new recovery, recycling and recharging units may not be appropriate for the HD market and should be addressed in a new procedure.

 

  • Refrigerant charging: The automotive industry has been able to reduce refrigerant charge for many cars to little more than a pound leading to extreme charge sensitivity. To accommodate these requirements, charging stations are being designed with smaller tanks (typically 15 lbs.) to accurately measure refrigerant both charged and recovered. Many HD MAC A/C systems have charge amounts of 6-10 lbs. making a 15- lb tank impractical.

suction line blockage peterbilt

  • Hoses/moisture ingression: Automotive A/C systems are compact and utilize hard lines with very little flexible hose. Moisture ingression is typically not an issue and desiccant is rarely, if ever, changed. HD MAC machines primarily use flexible hoses. Fire trucks and specialty equipment can have 120 feet of hose, making moisture ingression (and vacuum times) a significant concern even with Class I hose. A receiver drier with 12 in.3 of XH7 molecular sieve (common for HD applications) can adsorb 30g of water before becoming saturated. In a humid environment, the dryer may need to be replaced annually.

 

  • Filters/cab pressurization and sealing: Off-highway work machines and specialty vehicles often have a fixed recirculated/fresh air mix, which is regulated by filter restriction and cab sealing. The ventilation system is a critical part of proper operator environment conditioning. It would be appropriate to include filter and cab sealing maintenance in HD MAC-recommended procedures and training.

 

  • Field service: The off-highway and specialty vehicle HVAC technician often services equipment in the field without a recovery, recycling and recharge machine. Instead, the technician must use portable equipment yet still conform to EPA refrigerant recovery regulations. This is an area where a new document specifying appropriate equipment and service techniques may be most beneficial to the industry and HD MAC technician.

 

SAE Human Factors Technical Committee 6 (HFTC6) has agreed to work with MACS to develop a new standard to address HD MAC technician training and recommended procedures used to service and repair heavy duty truck, off-road work machine and specialty vehicle mobile air conditioning systems.

 

Robert L Brocx
HVAC Technical Steward, Red Dot Corporation
Chairman of the SAE Off-Highway Human Factors Technical Committee 6 (SAE HFTC6)
You can reach Robert at

RobertBrocx@RedDotCorp.com

 

Posted in #off road vehicles, ACtion Magazine, MACS Training Event, Mobile Air Conditioning, Refrigerants | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Dr. Mark Quarto to Keynote MACS 2017 Training Event – Feb 16, 2017


The role of mobile air conditioning (A/C) systems has dramatically changed as hybrid, plug-In hybrid, battery electric, extended range electric vehicle, and fuel cell vehicle technologies continue to populate the vehicle landscape. No longer strictly for vehicle cabin cooling, the A/C system has become a crucial system for cooling high voltage electronics and battery pack systems. With this new role the A/C system has now become part of a larger high voltage integrated thermal management system. Dr. Mark Quarto, currently the chief technology officer for FutureTech Auto, LLC. has extensive knowledge of the changing role of mobile A/C systems to share with MACS 2017 Training Event attendees on Thursday, February 16, 2017. This mobile A/C system integration means more service opportunities for MACS members.

 

Dr. Mark Quarto

Dr. Mark Quarto

“The MACS Keynote Luncheon, sponsored by Mahle Service Solutions is part of the three-day, high-value, industry-focused, exclusive technical training offered during MACS 2017 Training Event and Trade Show scheduled February 15-18 at the Anaheim Marriott in Anaheim, CA,” explained Elvis L. Hoffpauir, MACS president and chief operating officer. “MACS is proud to have Dr. Quarto discuss new technology as it applies to expanding the role of mobile A/C systems, and his message is a perfect fit with our training event theme, Mobile A/C: Global Service Horizons.”

Dr. Quarto’s technical experience includes 28 years at General Motors with the last 16 years dedicated to advanced vehicle development as an engineering group manager. His responsibilities included management and development of control and diagnostics systems and service solutions for the Chevrolet Spark, Chevrolet Volt, fuel cell, two-mode hybrid, parallel hybrid truck (PHT), EV1 electric vehicle, S10 electric truck and alternative fuel systems programs. In his prior 12 years at GM he was a service training development manager and resident technical training instructor.

Dr. Quarto holds a doctorate in technical education from Nova Southeastern University, specialized in design, development and technical education systems for hybrid and electric vehicles including high voltage energy and propulsion systems. He also earned a Master’s and two Bachelor degrees in electrical engineering and automotive technology.

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If you’re a service professional and not a MACS member yet, you should be!

Become a member and receive a monthly technical newsletter with information like what you’ve just read in this blog post visit http://bit.ly/10zvMYg for more information.

You can E-mail us at macsworldwide@macsw.org .

To locate a Mobile Air Conditioning Society member repair shop in your area.

Click here to find out more about your car’s mobile A/C and engine cooling system.

Mobile A/C professionals should plan to attend MACS 2017 Training Event and Trade Show, February 15-18 at the Anaheim Marriott in Anaheim, CA.

Click here to see MACS current public training schedule.

The MACS website is located at www.macsw.org

Posted in Automotive training, MACS Member, MACS Training Event, Mobile Air Conditioning | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Clogged radiator!


Johnny’s Radiator in Warren, AR is very busy right now and trucks with clogged radiators like this are one reason why!

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Make sure air flow is not restricted.

If you’re a service professional and not a MACS member yet, you should be!

Become a member and receive a monthly technical newsletter with information like what you’ve just read in this blog post visit http://bit.ly/10zvMYg for more information.

You can E-mail us at macsworldwide@macsw.org .

To locate a Mobile Air Conditioning Society member repair shop in your area.

Click here to find out more about your car’s mobile A/C and engine cooling system.

Mobile A/C professionals should plan to attend MACS 2017 Training Event and Trade Show, February 15-18 at the Anaheim Marriott in Anaheim, CA.

Click here to see MACS current public training schedule.

The MACS website is located at www.macsw.org

Posted in MACS Member, Mobile Air Conditioning, Refrigerants, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Do you know how to handle A/C for off highway vehicles?


 

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Like the light duty world, most heavy duty HVAC systems are tested using a laptop and specific software. However, the Freightliner M2 Business Class Truck HVAC controls and blower motor circuits can still be checked using common items found in most repair shops. Learn more in the July/August 2016 issue of  MACS ACTION magazine.

If you’re a service professional and not a MACS member yet, you should be!

Become a member and receive a monthly technical newsletter with information like what you’ve just read in this blog post visit http://bit.ly/10zvMYg for more information.

You can E-mail us at macsworldwide@macsw.org .

To locate a Mobile Air Conditioning Society member repair shop in your area.

Click here to find out more about your car’s mobile A/C and engine cooling system.

Mobile A/C professionals should plan to attend MACS 2017 Training Event and Trade Show, February 15-18 at the Anaheim Marriott in Anaheim, CA.

Click here to see MACS current public training schedule.

The MACS website is located at www.macsw.org

 

Posted in #off road vehicles, ACtion Magazine, MACS Member, Mobile Air Conditioning, Refrigerants, Training | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Where have all the “leakers” gone?


By Ward Atkinson, MACS Technical Advisor

It has been said that back in the days of R-12, A/C system engineers sometimes used “Band Aid” fixes to address A/C system issues.

Speaking as one of those early engineers, there is some truth in that. System refrigerant charges then were very large compared to those today. Those systems were expected to leak refrigerant and still continue to provide cooling for an acceptable interval before more refrigerant had to be added.

Of course, all that was back before environmental threats became recognized and the role of refrigerants such as R-12 were linked to ozone depletion and R-134a to global warming.

History of 2003 Chevrolet Impala Build Date: 10/2002 R-134a System Original Factory Charge: 992 grams (35 oz.) First Service 2009 at 6-3/4 Years (Poor Cooling): Recovered 454 grams (16 oz.) System Emissions at 6-3/4 Years: 79 g/yr. (2.8 oz.) Second Service 2012 (Hose Leak): No Refrigerant Recovered Lifetime 9-3/4 Years Refrigerant Total Loss: 1530 grams (54 oz.); 157 g/yr. (5.5 oz.)

History of 2003 Chevrolet Impala
Build Date: 10/2002
R-134a System Original Factory Charge: 992 grams (35 oz.)
First Service 2009 at 6-3/4 Years (Poor Cooling): Recovered 454 grams (16 oz.)
System Emissions at 6-3/4 Years: 79 g/yr. (2.8 oz.)
Second Service 2012 (Hose Leak): No Refrigerant Recovered
Lifetime 9-3/4 Years Refrigerant Total Loss: 1530 grams (54 oz.); 157 g/yr. (5.5 oz.)

All that changed with the transition from R-12 to R-134a. OE engineers and their Tier One suppliers revisited system and component designs, which resulted in mobile A/C systems that leak much less refrigerant and last much longer before any component failures.

Anecdotal evidence of improvements in system design to reduce refrigerant leakage is demonstrated through two vehicles operating in the Phoenix, AZ, area and which were serviced at the Car Repair Company.

One major initiative that contributed to these improvements was the I-MAC (Improved Mobile Air Conditioning) Program, which was facilitated through an SAE International Cooperative Research Program (CRP). The program was funded by government and industry.

One of the I-MAC goals was to reduce refrigerant system emissions. Reducing the system charge will result in lower emissions when the complete charge is lost due to system damage or failure of component parts. The data in this figure compares system charge amounts from 1990 to 2013. Some of the typical R-134a refrigerant charge amounts for 2015 systems range from 0.36Kg (12.69 oz.) to 0.7Kg (24.69 oz.) for single evaporator systems.

One of the I-MAC goals was to reduce refrigerant system emissions. Reducing the system charge will result in lower emissions when the complete charge is lost due to system damage or failure of component parts. The data in this figure compares system charge amounts from 1990 to 2013. Some of the typical R-134a refrigerant charge amounts for 2015 systems range from 0.36Kg (12.69 oz.) to 0.7Kg (24.69 oz.) for single evaporator systems.

MACS was specifically tasked to address service equipment that reduces refrigerant emissions during service and repair of mobile A/C systems. This included the improvement of refrigerant recovery, recycling and charging equipment for removal of refrigerant from the A/C system at the time of service, and provided more accurate refrigerant charge amounts. Another part of that work was to promote improvement of electronic leak detectors, which enabled technicians to identify smaller leaks in the A/C system. Additionally, MACS provided research, outreach and education designed to reduce refrigerant emissions through proper recovery when vehicles are scrapped.

The work to improve mobile A/C systems, components, service equipment and new mobile A/C systems continues under the stewardship of SAE International’s Interior Climate Control Standards Committee.

As mobile A/C systems have continued to evolve, the focus for A/C service shops has changed substantially. Back in the day, it was all about the A/C refrigerant circuit and components. Now, not so much.

Improper service by either unprofessional service shops or do-it-your-selfers with quick-fix interventions using something in a can may still foul up the A/C system refrigerant circuit. The manufacturers and sellers of A/C compressors have plenty to say about this.

Today’s focus for service shops is much more about electronic controls, and the ever-growing number of on board vehicle computers, which all have some say as to whether the vehicle A/C can operate (or not).

Our little corner of the automotive world continues to evolve but unfortunately, things are getting no easier for the service techs that have to troubleshoot and repair the A/C system.

If you’re a service professional and not a MACS member yet, you should be!

Become a member and receive a monthly technical newsletter with information like what you’ve just read in this blog post visit http://bit.ly/10zvMYg for more information.

You can E-mail us at macsworldwide@macsw.org .

To locate a Mobile Air Conditioning Society member repair shop in your area.

Click here to find out more about your car’s mobile A/C and engine cooling system.

Mobile A/C professionals should plan to attend MACS 2017 Training Event and Trade Show, February 15-18 at the Anaheim Marriott in Anaheim, CA.

Click here to see MACS current public training schedule.

The MACS website is located at www.macsw.org

Posted in #1234yf, Environmental Protection Agency, Refrigerants | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Regulating recharge


By Steve Schaeber, MACS manager of service training

Summertime is here, and that means many shops are feeling the full heat of A/C season. With temperatures rising, customers seeking cool rides, and to help them out (and keep their profits up), many shops are offering A/C System Top-Off Service. But in some parts of the U.S. that simple refill may not be legal (and if it is, it may be against your shop’s policy for ethical reasons). How then should you handle a customer who asks for it?

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulates mobile A/C system service, basically by requiring technicians to become Section 609 Certified and to use equipment and methods that meet certain standards. But one thing it doesn’t require is leak repair, which may seem counterintuitive for the nation’s top environmental agency. There are, however, several state and local laws that do require leak repair prior to recharging, which is something you should research in your area.

MACS knows about a few such laws, although certainly not all of them. In California, for example, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District (which includes several counties surrounding San Francisco) adopted Rule 7 of Regulation 12 on June 17, 1992. Section 301 states: No person shall add refrigerant to any motor vehicle air conditioning system unless that system has no detectable leaks. It further requires a visual inspection followed by the use of an electronic leak detector (which meets SAE Standards). Other California AQMDs have passed similar regulations.

In 2014 the Wisconsin Legislature passed AB 695, a law that repealed their state’s licensing requirement for mobile A/C technicians, instead requiring them to become Section 609 certified through an EPA approved agency (such as MACS). But this bill did not change Wisconsin’s existing leak repair law. The topping off of leaky systems is still prohibited under ATCP 136.20 (as is knowingly or negligently releasing refrigerant into the environment). Similar legislation exists in Colorado’s Air Quality Control Commission Regulation Number 15 (5 CCR 1001-19), which requires mobile A/C system leak testing in that state. Several other localities have issued the same laws, making it important for each shop and technician to know those laws applicable to where they live and work.

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This myriad of regulations stems from the early days of the CFC phase out (around 1990) when the revised Clean Air Act was passed, partially because some communities didn’t think existing rules went far enough. However, most areas of the U.S. simply follow the current federal program (Title 40 CFR, Part 82).

So what about that customer who insists they need a recharge, even though you’re sure their A/C system has a leak (including the really small ones)? We asked a few MACS member shops, and the consensus was pretty much the same across the board. Each response said it’s against their shop’s policy to recharge a leaking system (for ethical reasons; all MVAC refrigerants are ozone depleters and / or they contribute to global warming), and indicated they educate their customers as to why it’s such a poor service practice. In most cases, customers seem to agree and reschedule service when their finances allow.

MACS has always recommended that finding and fixing the leak(s) is the best solution for the customer and the environment. What’s the policy at your shop? How do your local laws compare? Send an e-mail to steve@macsw.org or visit our website http://www.macsw.org to let us know!

Posted in #1234yf, MACS Member, Mobile Air Conditioning, Refrigerants | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

A new retrofit


Joe Randazzo of Randazzo’s Auto Service, Lansdale, PA invited us over to see his new retrofit of a 1987 Camaro I-ROC.

1987 IROC Camaro

1987 IROC Camaro

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If you’re a service professional and not a MACS member yet, you should be!

Become a member and receive a monthly technical newsletter with information like what you’ve just read in this blog post visit http://bit.ly/10zvMYg for more information.

You can E-mail us at macsworldwide@macsw.org .

To locate a Mobile Air Conditioning Society member repair shop in your area.

Click here to find out more about your car’s mobile A/C and engine cooling system.

Mobile A/C professionals should plan to attend MACS 2017 Training Event and Trade Show, February 15-18 at the Anaheim Marriott in Anaheim, CA.

Click here to see MACS current public training schedule.

The MACS website is located at www.macsw.org

DSC_9418

Posted in Automotive, Automotive training, MACS Member, Mobile Air Conditioning, Training | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment