When the Fed speaks…


 

Chances are good that you’ve had this discussion with a customer at one time or another.

The Federal Trade Commission recently issued a news release that clarifies some facts and dispels many industry myths. Here’s what they said.

FTC Offers Tips on Making the Most of Your Auto Warranty

 

Can a dealer void your car’s warranty if you have someone else do routine maintenance on the vehicle?  The answer is no, and the Federal Trade Commission wants to make sure consumers know it.

Under federal law, it is illegal for manufacturers or dealers to refuse to honor a warranty or to deny coverage simply because someone other than the dealer did work on the car.  And dealers must be able to demonstrate that improper repair caused the damage that they refuse to cover.

The FTC, the nation’s consumer protection agency, offers these and other tips for American consumers to help them make smart decisions and get the most out of their auto warranties.  For example, if an independent mechanic improperly replaced a belt and the engine is damaged as a result, a manufacturer or dealer may only deny responsibility for fixing the engine under the warranty after demonstrating that the improper belt replacement – rather than some other defect – caused the engine damage.  However, the warranty would still be in effect for other parts of the car.

The same is true of ‘aftermarket’ parts made by a company other than the vehicle manufacturer or the original equipment manufacturer:  The manufacturer may not deny warranty coverage unless it can show that the aftermarket equipment caused the need for repairs.
Other tips from the FTC include:

  • Read the warranty that came with the car, or check the “Owners” section of the manufacturer’s website.
  • Be aware of when the warranty period ends, and get any problems that arise checked out beforehand.
  • Service the car at regular intervals, following the manufacturer’s recommended service schedule.
  • Keep all service records and receipts, regardless of who performs the service.  This includes oil changes, tire rotations, belt replacement, new brake pads, and inspections.  These receipts can be used to prove that the vehicle was properly maintained.
  • Complain if you believe your warranty claim has been denied unfairly.  Speak to a supervisor at the dealership, then go to the manufacturer or another dealer.  Consider filing a complaint with the state Attorney General, local consumer protection office, local Better Business Bureau, or the FTC.

 

When having your mobile A/C system professionally serviced, insist on proper repair procedures and quality replacement parts. Insist on recovery and recycling so that refrigerant can be reused and not released into the atmosphere.

If you’re a service professional and not a MACS member yet, you should be, click here for more information.
                                   

You can E-mail us at macsworldwide@macsw.org or visit http://bit.ly/cf7az8 to find a Mobile Air Conditioning Society member repair shop in your area. Visit http://bit.ly/9FxwTh to find out more about your car’s mobile A/C and engine cooling system.

The annual Mobile Air Conditioning Convention and Trade Show will take place January 18-20, 2012 at the Rio All Suite Hotel and Casino, Las Vegas, NV.

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About macsworldwide

Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) Worldwide Founded in 1981, MACS is the leading non-profit trade association for the mobile air conditioning, heating and engine cooling system segment of the automotive aftermarket. Since 1991, MACS has assisted more than 600,000 technicians to comply with the 1990 U.S. EPA Clean Air Act requirements for certification in refrigerant recovery and recycling to protect the environment. The Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) Worldwide’s mission is clear and focused--as the recognized global authority on mobile air conditioning and heat transfer industry issues. www.macsw.org
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