How technicians source A/C Compressors


By the staff of Aftermarket News

New 2010/2011 data from the Professional Automotive Repair Technician Survey (P.A.R.T.S.) shows that only 5 percent of technicians responding to the survey keep A/C Compressors in stock. They rely on 2.8 sources when it comes time to re-stock for the three jobs per month, on average, they perform requiring this part. P.A.R.T.S. is conducted annually by Counterman magazine and tracks technician preferences in a number of product categories.

The compressor is the most replaced A/C component and brand continues to score very high among technicians. As the chart below indicates, availability and good sales reps are two reasons shops will call a particular parts operation. Jobbers have gained a stronghold in supplying A/C compressors. In 2009, 38 percent of shops looked to jobbers to supply these parts. It’s now at 47 percent.

These and other statistics can be found in P.A.R.T.S., produced annually by Counterman magazine. Eleven years ago, Counterman began surveying repair shops annually to determine when, how and why they source specific automotive parts and products. The resulting data, published every fall, offers perspective on how sourcing and brand-loyalty trends have changed.

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About macsworldwide

Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) Worldwide Founded in 1981, MACS is the leading non-profit trade association for the mobile air conditioning, heating and engine cooling system segment of the automotive aftermarket. Since 1991, MACS has assisted more than 600,000 technicians to comply with the 1990 U.S. EPA Clean Air Act requirements for certification in refrigerant recovery and recycling to protect the environment. The Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) Worldwide’s mission is clear and focused--as the recognized global authority on mobile air conditioning and heat transfer industry issues. www.macsw.org
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